KMbeing

Knowledge Mobilization (KMb): Multiple Contributions & Multi-Production Of New Knowledge

The Knowledge of Stupidity

Everyone in this world – at some time in life – experiences moments when they feel stupid. It takes other times when we share our own knowledge with someone else to make us realize we’re not so completely stupid after all. Remember, it’s more important to focus on these knowledge moments rather than the “stupid” ones.  It’s also at those moments when we need to be thankful for the individual knowledge each of us has and that each of us can share.

That being said, it’s also important not to ignore too quickly those “stupid” moments and pretend as if they never happened. If we take time to think about those uncomfortable “stupid” moments for a second, and not so dismissively shy away from them – while also recognizing that everyone experiences them – we can begin to see how they challenge us to see our common humanity with all of its faults, failures and “stupidity” – and be better human beings.

When we see our common humanity and feel some sort of connection or bond with others based on our own shortcomings, “failures” or “stupidity” – these are moments when some of our best knowledge for the benefit of others can come forth. I believe that it’s because I can see the possibility of another person’s “stupidity” in myself, and recognize the possibility of another person’s embarrassment or hurt that I feel that person may challenge me to grow as a human being. These are possibilities of knowledge mobilization when I connect my own “knowledge of stupidity” to another person’s “knowledge of stupidity” and learn from them for future social benefit.  Instead of brushing them aside, we can see them as moments of knowledge opportunities, not only for us in our individual lives, but also to make this world a better place for everyone. By ignoring this “knowledge of stupidity” we do ourselves a huge disservice, for we lose any opportunity for knowledge mobilization.

On a wider socio-political scale – knowledge mobilization is about informing government and institutional policy makers to make better decisions based on growing knowledge that has been exchanged by researchers and research users.

On a wider human scale – knowledge mobilization is about informing everyone to make better decisions based on growing knowledge that has been exchanged by everyone. Yet how often in this wide world of humanity do our fears, embarrassment or ignorance stop us from growing and connecting with others through such knowledge moments.

Sandra Nutley in her book Using Evidence demonstrates that research utlization (=Knowledge Mobilization/KMb) is a social process. It’s this social nature of knowledge mobilization that allows individuals to connect around their “knowledge of stupidity”.

So next time you find yourself feeling “stupid” – take a moment to recognize it as a moment of knowledge mobilization to connect with the “knowledge of stupidity” for social benefit. Remember to recognize that everyone experiences feeling stupid at some point in their lives (even if they won’t admit it) and see how it challenges us to see our common humanity with all of its faults, failures and “stupidity” to be better human beings – connecting with others on a more human caring level – and maybe you (and the world we live in) won’t feel so stupid after all!

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