KMbeing

Knowledge Mobilization (KMb): Multiple Contributions & Multi-Production Of New Knowledge

Formal & Personal Knowledge Mobilization (KMb)

Dedicated followers of my KMbeing blog will know that my understanding of Knowledge Mobilization (KMb) has evolved over the recent years as KMb has emerged, and I have taken a more holistic (and perhaps idealistic) approach to Knowledge Mobilization from the more academic/institutional approach that has now been established.

I continue to recognize (what I call) more formal KMb as knowledge collaborations between researchers and research-users to inform public policy decision-makers to create social benefit. But I also see the value of Knowledge Mobilization on a more personal level – connecting each person’s individual knowledge with the knowledge of others to make the world a better place.

There are four essential factors that influence effective formal Knowledge Mobilization:

1)      Strong inter-organizational/institutional partnerships

2)      Using skilled knowledge brokers (like those found at York University’s KMb Unit and ResearchImpact – Canada’s Knowledge Mobilization Network)

3)      Meaningful involvement of “front-line” personnel – those involved in direct contact between researchers and community organizations

4)      Support (professionally and financially) by institutional leaders

There are four essential factors that influence effective personal Knowledge Mobilization:

1)      Value of one’s own knowledge

2)      Sharing one’s own knowledge with others

3)      Being open to the knowledge of others

4)      Combining knowledge to create meaningful, new knowledge to make the world a better place

Knowledge Mobilization (KMb) – both formal and personal – is about creating multi-directional connections of knowledge utilization, transfer and exchange for social benefit. It’s about establishing social relationships through multi-directional knowledge sharing.

More formally – knowledge can be translated and/or exchanged in several multi-directional and engaging ways:

  • mobilized from researcher(s) to researcher(s) within the academy
  • mobilized from researcher(s) to practitioner(s) or vice versa
  • mobilized from one institution or organization working with another
  • mobilized from community organizations to practitioner(s) to researcher(s)
  • mobilized from community organizations to researcher(s)
  • mobilized from researcher(s) to researcher(s) within or across institutions
  • mobilized from a tweeter/blogger (use of social media) to inform researcher(s) in academia
  • mobilized from word-of-mouth story-telling to organizations or researcher(s)

More personally – knowledge can be translated and/or exchanged in several multi-directional and engaging ways:

  • mobilized from person(s) to person(s) within a family
  • mobilized from person(s) to person(s) from within to outside a family (or vice versa)
  • mobilized from person(s) to co-worker(s)
  • mobilized from person(s) to person(s) within social circles (friends, volunteer communities, faith communities)
  • mobilized from a tweeter/blogger (using social media) to inform others
  • mobilized from comments of others (using social media) to inform tweeter/blogger
  • mobilized from word-of-mouth story-telling to strangers or new acquaintance(s)

In short – Knowledge Mobilization (KMb) can take place with and among anyone wanting to share knowledge with the intention of making the world a better place. At the heart of KMb is the intention of social benefit for everyone.

Whether you’re doing it formally or personally – are you mobilizing knowledge to make the world a better place?

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