KMbeing

Knowledge Mobilization (KMb): Multiple Contributions & Multi-Production Of New Knowledge

The New “Power” Of Knowledge Exchange

world share

Remember when people thought only the great scholars and teachers held all the knowledge to bestow upon the lowly, ignorant masses?  Or when government agencies moved forward with classified information kept from the public to keep them safe? (OK, I know intelligence operations still exist).  Keeping knowledge from the public has always been a way of holding the power.  As employee communications specialist Tarun Gill points out in Information sharing is power – not withholding it even within the corporate world there is a knowledge sharing paradigm shift.

 Keeping knowledge to yourself as a means of power is now a false and hollow action thanks to social media because social media is all about being social, exchanging knowledge and sharing “the power” to connect our diversity of knowledge together for social benefit. In this way, the world IS becoming a better place, less guarded, more open, more connected and more understanding. This is not to say that some still use knowledge as a weapon for harm in this world or that knowledge shared on social media is all useful and beneficial. It’s not! But for those of us who recognize the power of social media to make a difference in the world there’s no longer a need for knowledge to be guarded under lock and key and hidden away.

Using social media for knowledge sharing to make the world a better place provides everyone with an opportunity to make a difference, not only sharing power but lessening the power-struggles that occur from not sharing knowledge.  This is not only true for us “lowly and not so ignorant” masses in community but also for those academics and researchers in the ivory towers.

 I’ve said it before…social media is NOT a fad. Social media is here to stay and when we begin to use it for more than just the latest gossip or movie reviews we can see the tremendous power of knowledge sharing for everyone that can be an effective tool in not only community and business environments, but academic and government sectors as well.

A couple of my recent blog posts urged Canada’s classic Networks of Centres of Excellence that are funded by the Canadian Federal government to become more active using social media tools such as Twitter for greater and broader knowledge mobilization efforts. Although I focused on getting the NCEs to be more active – especially on Twitter – here are a few tips for anyone to use to harness the power of social media for knowledge exchange and the co-production of new knowledge for social benefit.

  • If you don’t have one already – create a Twitter account. For nothing else, it’s a great and easy place to start
  • To avoid what is referred to as “shiny object syndrome” – zoom in on pertinent subject matter by using Twitter hashtags which will also establish connections with topics, people and sites that are relevant to your interests
  • Don’t simply tweet without including links (unless you are engaging in the next bullet point)
  • Tweet with a 140 character conversation to connect with others not only from your own country but internationally from around the world to facilitate the social  in social media by engaging in dialogue and creating opportunities for further engagement and knowledge sharing with people from different cultures who also want to make the world a better place through knowledge exchange

As I urge everyone, if you don’t keep up with social media you run the risk of being left behind, not being connected, not able to contribute to making a difference in the world and sharing the new “power” of knowledge exchange for social benefit.

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