KMbeing

Knowledge Mobilization (KMb): Multiple Contributions & Multi-Production Of New Knowledge

Tag Archives: learning

Learning From Knowledge Failure

failure

How does failure to share knowledge teach you to try again to make knowledge exchange successful? Failure can be the building blocks to successful knowledge mobilization.

How Do You Value Your Own Knowledge?

value

Do you forget the knowledge you’ve shared with other people, and only remember the knowledge that other people have shared with you? Do you only think about your own knowledge as “weak” or “worthless”? Are you willing to see the value of your own knowledge as contributing something good in the world – knowledge that is stronger than “weak” and more valuable than “worthless”? Knowledge shared with the intention of good has value. When you share your knowledge with this intention you are making a difference.

Are there conditions to sharing our own knowledge? I think the answer to this question depends on how we value our own knowledge and why we share our own knowledge. If we see our own knowledge as being “worthless” or “not good enough” then we have placed a condition on our own knowledge sharing. But if we see our own knowledge sharing as an act of love for all humanity, an act of love for our planet, an act of love for future generations, an act of love from our own remarkable potential, then there must be more to our own personal knowledge than “weak” and “worthless”. There must be more to our own personal knowledge sharing than “not good enough” to share.

And if there is more to our own knowledge and sharing of this knowledge with the intention of making the world a better place for everyone then we must acknowledge that at the heart of knowledge sharing, at the heart of knowledge mobilization is love. If we are to share our knowledge we must share our knowledge with this in mind. Knowledge can be shared with the intention for good and knowledge can be shared with the intention for harm. If we share our own knowledge with the intention for good, if we share our own knowledge with kindness and compassion, being open-minded to learning from the diversity of others and the diversity of knowledge on this planet, we begin to see the world and knowledge sharing in a different and beneficial light.

When we start to see the inherent value of knowledge from all people we encounter on this planet we begin to see the knowledge of all people as contributing something good in the world. Yes, there are conditions to sharing our own knowledge than simply seeing whose knowledge is “better” than others and measuring individual knowledge against each other. That’s because every person’s knowledge is much more than “weak” or “worthless”. The big question is, how do you value your own knowledge?

Our Own Personal Knowledge Journeys

drop

Everyone has an opportunity to receive and discover new knowledge for ourselves when we share our own knowledge and are open to the knowledge of others. This knowledge journey is always a personal one that no one else can make for us. Our knowledge journey is created by a diversity of knowledge within this world with a continuing flow of knowledge sources that we can be connected to.

I’m always amazed at just how much knowledge the world has to share, yet how often many people overlook opportunities on a regular basis to make the world a better place simply by sharing knowledge. My attempts to develop my own knowledge from the gathered knowledge of others is always an ongoing journey. I have been able to discover and uncover knowledge in the most unexpected places with the most unexpected conversations that I open myself up to with others who may not always reflect my own sense of values or culture. Yet it’s precisely in these moments that knowledge is created. The bottom line is that when I’m open to the knowledge of others – even those that I may disagree with – my own knowledge is enhanced, changed and evolved.

As my years go by, I’ve also become more much aligned with my own sense of knowledge. When I am open to the knowledge of others and open to continuing to learn from others to enhance my own knowledge. I see that I have become less judgmental and I see the potential for knowledge sharing with people who I may not think have knowledge to share. I also see the world in a much more valuable and connected way.

We are all on our own knowledge journeys and must not be discouraged if some of our knowledge seems less “shinier” or “important” than others. Each of our knowledge journeys is about continuing to build the collective knowledge of our humanity together – whether it’s a drop of knowledge or a waterfall of knowledge, we are all contributing to the vast ocean of knowledge that all of us on this planet can share.

10 Knowledge Tips

tips

1. Your knowledge has value if you share it with the intention of doing good and not harm. Others may think your knowledge isn’t worth sharing but face those challenges. Sharing your knowledge for social benefit always makes it more valuable, not less.

2. Every person feels stupid sometimes. Every person. Everywhere. We all devalue our knowledge at times and we all get embarrassed. Remember the value of sharing your knowledge for good and when you feel stupid remember, “this, too, shall pass.”

3. Having curiosity about learning something new creates new knowledge.  Embrace curiosity and be open to the knowledge of others.  Exchanging knowledge and learning something new breaks down barriers.

4. Every day, you will feel like you have forgotten something. Maybe you’ve been too rushed.  Maybe you feel like you don’t have enough time. Don’t be too harsh on yourself. Especially if forgetting has caused what seems like a mistake and you feel stupid. Go back and read #2 again. Apologize if you need to and then move on. Seriously. Just move on and let it go.

5. The knowledge sharing, the listening, the talking, the  learning, the connections and the surprises.  It’s all part of it. And it’s all worth it to create new knowledge.

6. Knowledge is never perfect. Ever. But always worth sharing to create better knowledge.

7.  You will never regret sharing knowledge if it helps to improve someone else’s knowledge. Except for all of those times you second guess whether you have made a difference in making the world a better place.  Although it may only be in a small way, every bit of knowledge shared for benefit is better than knowledge shared to harm. Overall, this is what counts in the end.

8. Be open to the knowledge of others.  Other people who are very different from you will teach you something new, how to look more deeply at life and how to live and learn more fully.

9. Look for knowledge in everything.  You’ll find it in the middle of the busy. Or under the ridiculous. Or hanging out with the strange. Knowledge is like that. It’s in the middle of everything. It’s completely unpredictable. And it will surprise you when you’re not expecting it.

10.  Having knowledge of “the truth” is a myth. Knowledge isn’t black or white. Knowledge is a full range of colors and blends.  Strive for knowledge sharing to create new and always changing knowledge instead of “the truth”and trust your own knowledge sharing for social benefit to move knowledge forward in an ever-changing way.

Sharing Knowledge Strengthens Understanding

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Every act of knowledge sharing for social benefit creates new knowledge and strengthens understanding to make the world a better place.

Start With The Knowledge You Have

change the world

Remember, changing the world and harmful social conditions doesn’t depend on who you are or what you own – it depends mostly on the knowledge you share – whatever that knowledge is – if it’s intended for benefit and not for harm.  You change the world by using even the “limited” knowledge you have.  Start by being you with the knowledge you have…and keep going.

140 Twitter Characters To Knowledge Mobilization – Revisited

How have traditional models of research and dissemination changed to present new knowledge to the public or further inform research by creating broader public engagement?  Many researchers – particularly in the health sciences – are still embedded in long-established values and approaches to methodology and validity, often overlooking new modes of knowledge mobilization such as social media.

NCE Logo

One of my recent KMbeing blog posts presented a very brief Twitter survey of the 16 classic Networks of Centres of Excellence in Canada (NCE). The survey found that many of these NCEs are still not effectively using Twitter as a valuable social media tool that can enhance knowledge mobilization strategies. This quick overview showed that of those NCEs that could actually be found on Twitter only four NCEs tweet an average of just over one tweet per day – which is clearly insufficient for effective social media and potential stakeholder engagement. It would appear that using Twitter as part of a knowledge mobilization strategy is clearly not on the radar screen of many of these NCEs, despite the potential of Twitter (and social media) as a valuable means of addressing key outcomes mandated for NCEs – including working with end users to accelerate the creation and application of new knowledge.

To be fair, my own quick methodology of the previous survey focused on the average number of tweets per day over a 30 day period from the 14th February 2013 to the 15th March 2013.  The average number of tweets in a month was then divided by 30 to get the average number of tweets per day. Although the Twitter profile start date for each NCE was included along with the actual total number of tweets since each NCE began tweeting, this was not considered when doing the first brief survey.

So now, for part two of the original blog post survey 140 Twitter Characters To Knowledge Mobilization, I present a somewhat deeper (though still brief) analysis that takes into consideration the length of time each of these classic NCEs have used Twitter.

I used timeanddate.com to calculate the total number of days from the start date of each NCE Twitter profile to the 15th of March 2013 (up to and including March 15th to be consistent with the first survey). Then the total number of tweets since each NCE joined Twitter was divided by the total number of days each NCE has been using Twitter to create a tweet-intensity score.

Each NCE was then ranked, showing the following results:

Twitter Intensity Scores NCEs

 

                  

(Click on diagram above to enlarge)

Tweet-Intensity Ranking:

  1. Allergy, Genes and Environment Network – AllerGen
@AllerGen_NCE

(funding to 2019)

0.96

  1. AUTO21 Network of Centres of Excellence
@AUTO21NCE 

(funding to 2015)

0.83

  1. ArcticNet
@ArcticNet

(funding to 2018)

0.81

  1. Canadian Arthritis Network – CAN 
@commcan

(funding to 2014)

0.80

  1. Stem Cell Network – SCN
@StemCellNetwork

(funding to 2015)

0.73

  1. Carbon Management Canada – CMC
@cmc_nce

(funding to 2013)

0.47

  1. Canadian Stroke Network – CSN 
@strokenetwork

(funding to 2015)

0.37

  1. NeuroDevNet
@NeuroDevNet

(funding to 2014)

0.34

  1. Canadian Water Network – CWN
@CdnWaterNetwork

(funding to 2015)

0.28

  1. BioFuelNet 
@BioFuelNet

(funding to 2017)

0.13

  1. Graphics, Animation and New Media Canada – GRAND
@GRAND_NCE

(funding to 2014)

0.10

  1. Canadian Photonic Industry Consortium – CPIC 

Not Found

(no longer funded)

0.0

  1. GEOmatics for Informed DEcisions Network – GEOIDE 

Not Found

(no longer funded)

0.0

  1. Marine Environmental, Observation, Prediction and Response Network – MEOPAR 

Not Found

(funding to 2017)

0.0

  1. Mprime Network Inc.

Not Found

(funding to 2014)

0.0

  1. Technology Evaluation in the Elderly Network – TVN 

Not Found

(funding to 2017)

0.0

Although it’s still a simple calculation from the total number of tweets since each NCE started using Twitter, the current results show a more accurate tweet-intensity over time, with one of the NCEs – AllerGen – ranking first and showing a fairly impressive use of tweeting for the shorter amount of time on Twitter.
(It would be interesting to include the number of followers into the mix to see if that variable contributes to tweet effectiveness – but I’ll save that for a future blog post!).

However, results still show that the average number of tweets per day still remains well under the evidence that a minimum of at least ten tweets per day creates more valuable engagement and greater opportunities for knowledge dissemination. There’s still room for improvement to create greater social media engagement for more effective knowledge mobilization.

Just as a comparison, I decided to look at the results for Canada’s leading knowledge mobilization network ResearchImpact and my own KMbeing Twitter account.

Twitter Profile Twitter Name Twitter Start Total Days On Twitter Total Tweets Tweet-Intensity Score
ResearchImpact @researchimpact May 15, 2009

1401

9450

6.74

KMbeing @kmbeing March 25, 2010

1087

9982

9.18

researchimpact

KMbeing logo

(Perhaps this is the reason why both ResearchImpact and KMbeing were voted in the top ten Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Influencers for 2011 and 2012).

Canadian policymakers and government agencies have recognized the value of drawing together leading researchers and research institutions into national research networks to support trans-disciplinary and multi-sectoral collaboration.  The effectiveness of these research networks are also a great example to the rest of the world.  It’s a first step towards incorporating knowledge mobilization into strategic planning to successfully increase communication and collaboration among a variety of stakeholders. It’s a changing research model using networking as part of the research process.

The next step for Canada’s flagship Science & Technology networks is to increase the use of social media for knowledge mobilization.  Again, social media is not a fad, and the use of social media for academics and institutions is becoming more incorporated into strategic planning. Many researchers and academic institutions are recognizing the value of using Twitter in a more consistent and productive manner for knowledge mobilization.

David Phipps

As David Phipps, Executive Director of Research and Innovation Services at York University (and ResearchImpact) pointed out in a keynote address to the Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum in 2012 (and posted on the blog MobilizeThis!), the future of knowledge mobilization and research engagement will depend on social media, but researchers and knowledge mobilizers are still trying to figure out how to effectively use social media to do this.

15-20 years ago IT folks had to develop a business case to convince corporate leaders to invest in an enterprise e mail system. Today e mail is a fact of life (unfortunately). Many of us are now using social media as a broadcasting tool and a large portion are also using it as a listening tool. We are now starting to figure out how to use social media as a tool for engagement but we’re not there yet. These trends will accelerate.”

Just as email changed society, so too is social media changing the traditional models of research, dissemination and engagement. Social media provides new modes of knowledge exchange and broader public input, creating a further research resource in the current KMb world as a way of providing broader participation in discussions around research topics.  Social media also breaks down international barriers to share academic research in a way that is more friendly and immediate to a wider audience. Yet, social media is still a tool that needs to be used correctly to be effective (see my previous blog for tips on how to do this).

Canada’s Networks of Centres of Excellence are making a start.  They just need to continue to take a few more steps forward into new modes of research and into the future of using social media – especially Twitter – for knowledge mobilization.

140 Twitter Characters To Knowledge Mobilization

The use of Twitter as an effective social media tool for knowledge mobilization is still not understood. This was made clear to me by two things that happened this past week:

1)      I was actively involved in a discussion with several members of EENet – the Evidence Exchange Network where the use of Twitter for research dissemination was called into question

AND

2)     I performed a brief Twitter survey of the 16 classic Networks of Centres of Excellence in Canada (NCE) that focus on research-driven partnerships, and found that these NCEs are still not effectively using this valuable social media tool, despite the Government of Canada’s knowledge mobilization mandate for NCEs “to transform these discoveries into products, services, and processes that improve the quality of life of Canadians.

First, the EENet Discussion:

EENet logo

Melissa MindyourMind

Melissa Taylor-Gates, Social Media and Project Coordinator for the award-winning MindyourMind (@mindyourmind_ca on Twitter) was interested in hearing about what other members of EENet are doing “to engage in meaningful knowledge mobilization” and how people use social media to achieve this goal. She started the discussion-ball rolling. The conversation soon focused on the use of Twitter as a key social media tool for academic/institutional researchers to engage with a wider and more diverse audience about research being done. Melissa aptly called Twitter “the great equalizer” and demonstrated this point with an excellent graphic showing the difference between equality and equity (which I gratefully co-opted for one of my blog posts here), making a further point that using social media for research dissemination is “more than just making a paper available to everyone online, it’s translating the information into accessible means.”

Well said Melissa!

These comments sparked valuable discussion – especially around how to sift through the deluge of information to find accurate, evidence-based research findings and trusted sources on Twitter. (For more about sifting through what I refer to as data/information noise, see my previous blog post here). One member’s comment, “I devoutly hope that no-one would assume that they could get sound clinical research information from a tweet” and concerns about the limitations of 140 characters caused a flurry of counter-comments.  Many EENet members pointed out how to find Twitter sources for relevant and useful research to credible peer-reviewed journals and Twitter profiles using hashtags and hyperlinks.

Some of the key messages that came out of this discussion are that Twitter is simply a tool – just another medium of sharing information, good or not so good, that can be used properly or not, requiring further learning and skill to effectively use social media for knowledge mobilization.  In contrast to Marshall MacLuhan, in this case the medium is not the message – the content is the message. Yet, it’s an important social media tool that is no longer a fad or waste of time. Twitter is an effective tool for knowledge mobilization. For my practice as KMbeing, Twitter has successfully created knowledge networking connections with researchers and other stakeholders from Canada, U.S., U.K. and Denmark where we have continued knowledge collaboration offline and in-person at conferences and other events. Yet, like any social relationships, social media relationships also require time and regular tending.

 

NCE

Twitter survey of the core 16 of Canada’s Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE):

 Using social media – especially Twitter – as an effective tool for knowledge translation and mobilization is being adopted more by academics and formal institutions as a way of contributing to greater social benefit. Each day sees an increase in the number of Twitter accounts being created by universities and research organizations, but simply having a Twitter account and only sporadically posting information is not an effective way of using Twitter for knowledge mobilization.

As Canada’s preeminent Science & Technology investments, I was curious to see what type of presence the core NCEs have on Twitter and how they might be using this effective social media tool as one of the products and processes (mentioned on the NCE website) for knowledge mobilizing of multidisciplinary research from across Canada (and from around the world) as a mandate from Canada’s funding agencies:

Although my survey is only a very brief overview of average daily tweets, completed over a day on March 15th, 2013, it does reveal that only 11 out of 16 classic NCEs are easily found on Twitter, and that only four NCEs tweet an average of just over one tweet per day – which is clearly insufficient for effective stakeholder engagement.

NCE Twitter Survey
(click on diagram to enlarge)
(Note: Last tweet = number of hours since or date of last tweet)

Evidence shows that users who tweet between 10 and 50 times per day have more followers on average than those that tweet more or less frequently, and have greater opportunities for knowledge dissemination and engagement.

Tweets per day
So what does this say about missed opportunities for increased research dissemination and collaboration between researchers and research users using social media for knowledge mobilization?

 It appears that the Networks of Centres of Excellence have yet to fully embrace the potential of Twitter (and social media) as a valuable means of addressing key outcomes mandated for NCEs:

  • Mobilizing multi-disciplinary research capacity from across Canada
  • Engaging partners from multiple academic institutions and various public and private-sector organizations
  • Working with end users to accelerate the creation and application of new knowledge
  • Increasing collaboration between researchers in Canada and abroad

This is either because – like some EENet members – they’re not fully aware of the potential for research outreach and engagement using Twitter, or the NCEs have not identified this as a priority despite the evidence (presented in a book chapter that I co-authored) of using social media as a means of applying research for public benefit using knowledge mobilization.

For those still uncertain among Canada’s NCEs (and other researchers) as to how to best approach and develop a social media strategy using Twitter, here are some tips:

  • If your NCE doesn’t have one already – create a Twitter account. For nothing else, protect your brand by reserving your naming rights on Twitter.
  • Use a simple and descriptive name for your Twitter profile that will clearly identify your affiliation with your NCE and include a brief description of the research focus
  • To avoid what is referred to as “shiny object syndrome” – zoom in on pertinent subject matter by using Twitter hashtags which will also establish connections with topics, people and sites that are relevant to your research
  • Designate individuals within the NCE whose primary responsibility is for populating, maintaining and monitoring your Twitter account, ensuring they have the time and enthusiasm to consistently tweet and retweet several times throughout each day. This isn’t a full time job but needs to be someone’s job.
  • Don’t simply tweet without including links (unless you are engaging in the next bullet point)
  • Tweet with a 140 character conversation to connect with other national and international researchers and stakeholders in your discipline to facilitate the social in social media by engaging in dialogue and creating opportunities for further engagement online and offline
  • Regularly schedule a monthly evaluation of your Twitter account’s success and be prepared to realign your Twitter content and approach

Social media is not a fad, and the use of social media for academics and institutions is becoming more incorporated into strategic planning. Many researchers are now recognizing the value of using Twitter in a more consistent and productive manner for knowledge mobilization. Perhaps it’s time that some of Canada’s NCEs and mental health stakeholders do the same.

Equality Of Knowledge vs Equity Of Knowledge

equality-vs-equity

Not all knowledge is of the same value – but all knowledge for social benefit can contribute to making the world a better place.  The difference between equality of knowledge and equity of knowledge is providing opportunities to level the playing field in sharing knowledge.

The Persistence Of Sharing Knowledge

persistence

When we persist in sharing knowledge for social benefit it becomes easier for us to do.  Not that the nature of the knowledge has to be earth-shattering, but it’s the ongoing action of taking steps to contribute to greater knowledge for good that makes the world a better place. Any bit of knowledge shared for social benefit can make a difference.

I’ll never know what knowledge I may have gained if I had other opportunities in my life. But life is about choices, and I’ve made the choice many times to give something up in favor of something else, and in the process, making new knowledge connections while missing others. That doesn’t mean that the knowledge that I have shared or gained can’t continue to make a difference. It’s all about the persistence of continuing to share the knowledge I have and be open to the knowledge of others that makes the difference.

This persistence in sharing knowledge reminds me of when I first started writing my knowledge mobilization (KMb) KMbeing blog. My first blog post on April 3rd 2010 was a first step into the unknown as I wondered if my knowledge sharing could make a difference. Almost anyone can write a blog and share knowledge. It’s the persistence in adding a new post at regular intervals that has helped me recognize that I can make a difference for good that makes the world a better place. By consistently sharing my knowledge and learning from the knowledge of others each day over the past few years, I have been able to connect with people from over 140 countries, and gained recognition as one of Canada’s top ten knowledge mobilization influencers.

Sharing bits of my knowledge on my blog has invariably become much easier for me simply due to persistence – and I believe this can happen for almost anyone if they persist in continuing to share their own knowledge and be open to the knowledge of others.

As we share our knowledge more openly with each other, our world becomes more connected, which can lead to greater recognition of our diversity and our common humanity – ultimately leading to greater understanding, and hopefully a world of greater harmony. 

Unfortunately, though, many people feel the discomfort and insecurity of sharing their own knowledge and they quit (or don’t even start) before they ever give their knowledge the opportunity to contribute to social benefit – they quit before their chances increase.

Public speakers grow by speaking, writers grow by writing, bloggers grow by blogging – knowledge grows by sharing. In whatever manner you want to share your own knowledge, just start and it can make a difference. The more we do something, the better we get at it and the easier it becomes for us. That temptation to give up is simply avoiding the discomfort or insecurity of believing in the power of one’s own knowledge to make a difference. It’s about not second-guessing that somehow even the “limited” knowledge we think we may have can’t connect with someone else’s knowledge and move towards making a difference in this world. It’s all about the persistence of sharing knowledge for social benefit that can make the difference.